Analytical-Solution - What can your DATA do for you?

Can 22 million developers help solve the biggest world problems? ABSOLUTELY!!!


We all read the articles about the millions of dollars that are being made via the latest technology but what you don’t hear much about is all the GOOD technology can do as well – the disaster that can be prevented, the warnings that can be made better to save lives in hurricanes, tornado, tsunami, earthquakes, etc until NOW - IBM’s $30 million investment over five years will fund access to developer tools, technologies, free code and training with experts. The winning team will receive a financial prize, yet, perhaps more rewarding, they will have access to long-term support to help move their idea from prototype to real-world application.

This is the largest and most ambitious effort to bring startup, academic and enterprise developers together to solve one of the most pressing societal issues of our time, which is preventing, responding to and recovering from natural disasters. Come join the CALL and do some GOOD and win a little money while we’re at it!

Hat off to you all for starting this initiative!

 


Brad Kieserman, vice president of Disaster Cycle Services at the American Red Cross.  -> “Responding to large-scale national and international disasters is a team effort, and we are excited to leverage skills and insights from the tech industry to address global challenges“

 

Call for Code, IBM and David Clark Cause are joining forces with the United Nations Human Rights Office and its human rights-based approach to humanitarian action, which focuses on securing the participation of affected groups in preparedness, response and recovery efforts, and bringing attention to the most excluded and marginalized populations.https://www-03.ibm.com/press/in/en/pressrelease/54007.wss

 

More about #CallForCode

Who is invited to take part in this initiative? Call for Code invites developers to create new applications to help communities and people better prepare for natural disasters. For example, developers may create an app that uses weather data and supply chain information to alert pharmacies to increase supplies of medicine, bottled water and other items based on predicted weather-related disruption. Or developers could create an app that predicts when and where the disaster will be the most severe, so emergency crews can be dispatched ahead of time in proper numbers to treat those in need.

Ginni Rometty, chairman, president and CEO, IBM, reached out to the technology industry to assist in build a better future, committing IBM technology and $30 million USD over five years in the annual Call for Code Global Initiative. Its goal is to unite the world's developers and tap into data and AI, blockchain, cloud and IoT technologies to address social challenges. 

Through the Call for Code, IBM and David Clark Cause are joining forces with the United Nations Human Rights Office and its human rights-based approach to humanitarian action. This humanitarian action focuses on securing the participation of affected groups in preparedness, response and recovery efforts, and bringing attention to the most excluded and marginalized populations.

IBM has invested this amount of money over a five-year period and the company will fund access to developer tools, technologies, free code and training with experts. The winning team will receive a financial prize. More rewarding, they will have access to long-term support to help move their idea from prototype to real-world application. This includes ongoing developer support through IBM's partnership with the Linux Foundation.

http://www.iotevolutionworld.com/fog/articles/438575-ibms-call-code-cloud-data-ai-blockcha-for.htm

https://thoughtleaders.ng/ibm-call-for-code-to-use-cloud-data-ai-blockchain-for-natural-disaster-relief/

https://developer.ibm.com/code/2018/06/22/call-for-code-webcast-1/

https://callforcode.org/

#CallForCode


 

When natural disaster strike, stop talking and affect real change.


 


When I was a kid, I lived in Biloxi, Mississippi. One of the first things I learned when I moved there was that, in 1969, Biloxi was hit by one of the most intense hurricanes recorded in the US. Hurricane Camille formed in the Gulf of Mexico and hit Mississippi as a Category 5 storm, causing more than 256 deaths.  I had moved away when Hurricane Katrina hit Biloxi, Gulfport, Pascagoula, Ocean Springs, New Orleans. UGH.  I remember watching the news and seeing that it was going to be bad. We all wished that there was something we could do, but we watched helplessly as the hurricane destroyed the area.

When I lived in Savannah, Georgia in the last 80s, Hurricane Hugo was supposed to hit us. We were prepared with supplies. We had everything packed up and were ready to hit the road at a moment’s notice. But then, out of the blue, the storm changed direction and hit Charleston, S.C - which was much less prepared than we were. In the winter of 1998, I moved to Chicago for a job. While they don’t get hurricanes, in my first winter there, a huge blizzard stranded people, leaving people in the cold and without food.  

In the hurricanes and the snow storm, I had the same thought: I wish there was more I could do to help.

Using tech to combat natural disaster fallout

These days, we can send messages around the world in seconds via phones and computers, teach robots to do mundane task, and train computers to think like humans, so WHY can’t we do more to prepare for natural disasters? Mother Nature is powerful and unpredictable, but we’ve made inroads with having earlier warnings that help people better prepare and first responder respond, which all leads to reduced loss of property and life. So, why not take it further?

All natural disaster have a lynchpin -- something that starts them, whether it’s a cold front mixing with a warm front, or high pressure mixing with very humid conditions meeting a low front, or the release of gases from the surface in the case of earthquakes. While some patterns are harder to spot, why not use what we know to learn about things we don’t? We know water will follow the path of least resistance, so why not plan accordingly? We know Africa is surrounded by water, yet millions of people and animals have died there due to lack of clean water. If rich desert countries can convert sea water to fresh water, why not all countries? The military and NASA can talk to each other in ALL conditions, but rescuers at natural disaster sites often find it hard to complete simple tasks due to a lack of communication channels.

What if we could use technology to scour data, finding trends and building models that prevent or alleviate future suffering from some of the world’s worst disasters? THIS is what Call for Code is all about. It’s a worldwide, multi-year initiative that asks developers to solve pressing global problems with sustainable software solutions.

With Call for Code, IBM is teaming up with the Linux Foundation, the American Red Cross, the NEA, the Weather Company and other organizations to build software that helps us better prepare for and respond to natural disasters. Paying for this five-year initiative is not just a fly-by-night program. It will involve thousands of developers, millions of lines of code, many sleepless nights, and a few hundred cases of Red Bull. In the end, a developer will not only win the grand prize money, but also make a difference in this world.

As I sit back and think of all the natural disasters I’ve witnessed in my life -- all the billions of dollars that have been spent recouping from disasters, all the millions of homes destroyed, and the thousands upon thousands of lives that have been lost – I refuse to keep doing nothing. I can use my coding skills to make a real difference, so I’ll start there.

Join the call

If you’re serious about making change – a difference - take this challenge and let’s do something! It’s time to stop sending thoughts and prayers.  WE CAN make a difference. WE CAN affect change across the world.

Unite and be part of this effort to make a difference where natural disasters are concerned. Will you take the challenge? Will you heed the CALL FOR CODE?

Get started now.

Help build solutions for natural disaster preparedness (and win $200k!!!!!!!) Learn more: http://bit.ly/2tWSawX 

The Linux Foundation's Trishan de Lanerolle on building better software for disaster response[EM1] . #CallforCode https://mobilebusinessinsights.com/author/trishan-de-lanerolle/

 

#CallForCode