Push verses Pull – are you marketing or spamming

There have been a lot of articles over the years; going into great depth about “Push verses Pull Marketing” therefore I am not going to over kill the subject by regurgitating what has already been written. What I will add is that marketing has changed with the introduction of social media into our daily regimen, analysis and reporting. We try various things when we, break into the world of social media, i.e. “push verses pull” marketing, do we blast our message to the world or do we provide great content and let them come to us? In my time on social media, I have seen links stolen and articles cloned, “how many likes for this” (what?) Facebook post, pins redirected to unintended sites and auto-posting gone mad with old articles from 2010 passed around like “hot news” because no one even bothered to read the article they just wanted to re-tweet someone with high Klout. So, push marketing has definitely taken on a new aspect, it is not just about spitting out your product news to anyone out there, it about misdirection and un-professional behavior. Followers and fans figure this out pretty fast so any sales they make are a single purchase and not about building a loyal clientele. I guess if that is your purpose, you have succeeded but businesses are built on longevity not tricks. I have seen great social media campaigns which made me think, giggle, scratch my head and lean into with anticipation of their next tweet so I know there are many companies that are doing it right. Hats off to the social media teams out there that create great content that goes viral and circles the world, you inspire us to turn it up a notch! Companies like Kellogg’s want to be part of your family, they don’t blast their message to unexpected recipients or beg you to “like” their page, they drip, drip, drip, with their messages, until one days, boom, you need cereal and without even thinking, you are buying corn pops.
It takes time to build a following, good marketers know this and slowly build a loyal following through likes, re-tweets, pins, discussion on LinkedIn groups and providing thought provoking content and ads. Occasionally ads go viral but the norm is to engage and be the 1st product or service that pops into someone minds. Take me for example, I am not unique by any means, they are lots of great people out there to follow. I started my Twitter account in 2010 but didn’t bring in the business aspect until March 2011, since then I have added over 5,000 followers, not because I have a high Klout score, beg for followers or talk about my business every 5 minutes. I spend hours a day searching for relevant content to share with my fans and friend on social media, to educate, inform, entertain and spread the word about analysis, data mining, mathematics as well as good habits in analytics and social media marketing. Not because I want to just give away good content but to form a relationship, to imprint my name, whether it be @data_nerd, Carla Gentry or Analytical Solution, into your mind so when you need research, sentiment or text analysis, social media campaign and analytical marketing you’ll head over to my site and give me a call.
In conclusion, when you are creating your social media marketing plan, keep this in mind, do you want to be a household name or a spammer who “gets and loses” followers on a daily basis, the choice is yours. Blast your message to anyone who will listen or target your message, create relevant content, respect your followers, and follow up with leads in a dignified manner. Engage and show potential clients why they should do business with you, if you have expert knowledge, share with others and promote your field. No matter what strategy you use (push verse pull), showing you and your businesses character might not make you a millionaire but I guarantee it will lengthen your business career and lifetime earning potential. Thanks for taking the time to read this article and have a great day of marketing!