More information doesn’t mean correct information: Do you really know?

I had a gentleman tell me today that he read that companies were becoming more efficient, that more was being done by fewer employees. Wow, really, are we that naive? The truth is that 84% of employees polled said that they would leave their jobs if another position became available (CNN Money). Guess what employers, the economy is getting better and companies are starting to hire again. If you haven’t already lost some of your employees, you will. So, why do stories conflict each other, because no one checks their facts or they put too much faith in what they hear from friend without verification. Recently I was told that “Person X” was an expert at a particular subject, only to find out, not only did this person not know what he was doing, he also caused a rift in the department that caused others to quit. How did this happen, the person in charge of hiring was not qualified to understand the intricacies of the position but his biggest mistake was, he assumed that the resume was 100% correct. In fact a 2010 survey suggests that 53% of perspective employees lie on their resume (click here). So, would some follow up with previous employers or checking references have changed the above scenario? Probably not, suggestions are to mandate a 90 day review and it have completed by the person working closest to the new hire. Co-workers know faster than anyone what is “really” going on. Below is from A Checklist for Success in Hiring Employees (http://humanresources.about.com/od/recruiting/a/recruitingtips.htm) Companies that select new employees from the candidates who walk in their door or answer an ad in the paper or online are missing the best candidates. They’re usually working for someone else and they may not even be looking for a new position. Here are steps to take to improve your candidate pool. • Invest time in developing relationships with university placement offices, recruiters and executive search firms. • Enable current staff members to actively participate in industry professional associations and conferences where they are likely to meet candidates you may successfully woo. • Watch the online job boards for potential candidates who may have resumes online even if they’re not currently looking. • Use professional association Web sites and magazines to advertise for professional staff. The key is to build your candidate pool before you need it. Good luck and remember to always check your facts and follow up on employee complaints.

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